DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA

RECOGNIZING B.E.D. SYMPTOMS IN ADULTS

Hypothetical provider and patient portrayals. Individual results may vary.

B.E.D. is the most common eating disorder in US adults*1

It’s more prevalent than bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN) combined.*1,2

Drug treatment is not indicated for all adult patients with B.E.D.

*Estimated 12-month and lifetime prevalence among an eating disorder–assessed subsample (n=2,980) of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative face-to-face household survey of English-speaking adults aged ≥18 years.1,2

Yes, there can be a stigma that surrounds having B.E.D., but people with B.E.D. are worth the discussion. Both patients and healthcare professionals need to educate themselves and talk openly about it.

— Ryan, diagnosed with moderate B.E.D. and treated with Vyvanse

B.E.D. may go undiagnosed

In an online survey of 22,397 US adults, 344 met DSM-5® diagnostic criteria for B.E.D. in the past 12 months (level of severity not specified). Of those: 3.2% (11 of 344) reported ever receiving a diagnosis of B.E.D. by a healthcare provider.†3

Data from a 2013 online survey of adults aged ≥18 years.3

There is no typical adult B.E.D. patient

Adults with B.E.D. represent a diverse spectrum of patient types

B.E.D. affects both men and women.1 In US adults, B.E.D. is observed across racial and ethnic groups.‡4,5

‡Based on analysis of a combined data set of 3 nationally representative US samples consisting of non-Latino whites, Latinos, Asians, and African Americans.5

Mean age of onset

Onset of B.E.D. occurs at a later mean age compared with bulimia nervosa (BN) and anorexia nervosa (AN)§1

§ Data (based on Version 3.0 of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview and DSM-IV® criteria) from an eating disorder-assessed subsample (n=2,980) of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative face-to-face household survey of English-speaking adults aged ≥18 years.1

Eating disorders are very personal and private and not everyone with B.E.D. looks the same. Our physiques do not always reflect what’s going on inside.

— Kabara, diagnosed with moderate B.E.D. and treated with Vyvanse

B.E.D. is a distinct disorder

B.E.D. is distinct from obesity and overeating. Although B.E.D. can be associated with increased weight, it occurs in normal-weight, overweight, and obese adults.§1

§Data (based on Version 3.0 of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview and DSM-IV® criteria) from an eating disorder-assessed subsample (n=2,980) of the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCSR), a nationally representative face-to-face household survey of English-speaking adults aged ≥18 years.1
||Current body mass index (BMI) in adults with 12-month prevalence of B.E.D. among the NCSR survey population detailed above.1
BMI=body mass index.

B.E.D. vs Overeating

While overeating is a challenge for many Americans, recurrent binge-eating is much less common and far more severe.6

DSM-5® diagnostic criteria for adults with binge eating disorder (B.E.D.)4

To be diagnosed with B.E.D., individuals must meet the following criteria adapted from the DSM-5®:

Recurrent episodes of binge eating characterized by both of the following:

    1
  • Consuming an abnormally large amount of food in a short period of time compared with what others might eat in the same amount of time under the same or similar circumstances
    2
  • Experiencing a loss of control over eating during the episode

Episodes feature at least 3 of the following:

    1
  • Consuming food faster than normal
  • 2
  • Consuming food until uncomfortably full
  • 3
  • Consuming large amounts of food when not hungry
    4
  • Consuming food alone due to embarrassment over how much one is eating
  • 5
  • Feeling disgusted, depressed, or guilty after the binge

Overall, there is significant distress about the binge eating.

The binge eating occurs, on average, at least once per week for 3 months.

The binge eating is not associated with regular compensatory behavior associated with bulimia nervosa and does not occur solely during an episode of bulimia nervosa or anorexia nervosa.

Diagnosis should be based upon a complete evaluation of the patient that confirms the criteria for B.E.D. established in DSM-5®.

My doctor’s willingness to listen and to ask the right questions—and recognize my B.E.D.—made such a difference in my life.

— Parker, diagnosed with moderate B.E.D. and treated with Vyvanse

Severity of B.E.D. (based on DSM-5®)4

The minimum level of severity is based on the number of binge eating episodes per week, and may be increased to reflect other symptoms and the degree of functional disability.

As embarrassed as I felt, I had a frank discussion with my nurse practitioner about my multiple binges per day and the emotions I felt before, during, and after a binge. After my medical evaluation, she diagnosed my condition as severe B.E.D.

— Kathy, diagnosed with severe B.E.D. and treated with Vyvanse

Binge Eating Disorder Screener-7

This patient-reported screener can help you screen adults who you suspect may have B.E.D.


Why Vyvanse® for B.E.D. in Adults

Hypothetical patient portrayal.
Individual results may vary.

WHY VYVANSE FOR B.E.D. IN ADULTS

See Vyvanse clinical trial results for moderate to severe B.E.D. in adults.

Hypothetical patient portrayal

KEEP IN TOUCH

Stay up to date with the latest information to help support your Vyvanse patients.

References
  1. Hudson JI, Hiripi E, Pope HG Jr, Kessler RC. The prevalence and correlates of eating disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication [published correction appears in Biol Psychiatry. 2012;72(2):164]. Biol Psychiatry. 2007;61(3):348‐358.
  2. Kessler RC, Berglund PA, Chiu WT, et al. The prevalence and correlates of binge eating disorder in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys. Biol Psychiatry. 2013;73(9):904-914.
  3. Cossrow N, Pawaskar M, Witt EA, et al. Estimating the prevalence of binge eating disorder in a community sample from the United States: comparing DSM-IV-TR® and DSM-5® criteria. J Clin Psychiatry. 2016;77(8):e968-974.
  4. Adapted from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5®). 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association; 2013;350-353.
  5. Marques L, Alegria M, Becker AE, et al. Comparative prevalence, correlates of impairment, and service utilization for eating disorders across US ethnic groups: Implications for reducing ethnic disparities in health care access for eating disorders. Int J Eat Disord. 2011;44(5):412-420.
  6. American Psychiatric Association. DSM-5® Fact Sheet. Feeding and eating disorders. http://www.dsm5.org/documents/eating%20disorders%20fact%20sheet.pdf. Accessed September 8, 2020.

INDICATION AND IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION