INDICATION AND LIMITATION OF USE

Vyvanse is indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients ages 6 and above. Vyvanse is not indicated or recommended for weight loss. Use of other sympathomimetic drugs for weight loss has been associated with serious cardiovascular adverse events. The safety and effectiveness of Vyvanse for the treatment of obesity have not been established.

This site is intended for US healthcare professionals only.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

WARNING: ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

  • CNS stimulants (amphetamines and methylphenidate-containing products), including Vyvanse, have a high potential for abuse and dependence. Assess the risk of abuse prior to prescribing and monitor for signs of abuse and dependence while on therapy.
Full Safety Information Below

Vyvanse is indicated for the treatment of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in patients ages 6 and above. Vyvanse is not indicated or recommended for weight loss. Use of other sympathomimetic drugs for weight loss has been associated with serious cardiovascular adverse events. The safety and effectiveness of Vyvanse for the treatment of obesity have not been established.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION    This site is intended for US healthcare professionals only.

WARNING: ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

  • | CNS stimulants (amphetamines and methylphenidate-containing products), including Vyvanse, have a high potential for abuse and dependence. Assess the risk of abuse prior to prescribing and monitor for signs of abuse and dependence while on therapy.
Full Safety Information Below

ADHD Symptoms and DSM-5® Diagnostic Criteria for ADHD in Adults

DSM-5® divides ADHD symptoms into 3 categories: predominantly inattentive presentation, predominantly hyperactive/impulsive presentation, and combined presentation.1

To be diagnosed with ADHD, individuals must meet the following criteria adapted from the DSM-5®:

  • 5 or more symptoms of inattention and/or hyperactivity/impulsivity must have persisted for at least 6 months to a degree that is inconsistent with developmental level and that negatively impacts directly on social and academic/occupational activities.1

ADHD Symptoms of Inattention*1

  • Makes careless mistakes/lacks attention to detail
  • Has difficulty sustaining attention
  • Exhibits poor listening skills
  • Fails to follow through on tasks and instructions
  • Displays poor organization
  • Avoids tasks requiring sustained mental effort
  • Loses things necessary for tasks/activities
  • Easily distracted (including unrelated thoughts)
  • Is forgetful in daily activities

ADHD Symptoms of Hyperactivity/Impulsivity*1

  • Fidgets with or taps hands/feet or squirms in seat
  • Leaves seat in situation when remaining seated is expected
  • Experiences feelings of restlessness
  • Has difficulty engaging in quiet leisure activities
  • Is “on the go” acting as if “driven by a motor”
  • Excessive talking
  • Blurts out answers
  • Difficulty waiting turn
  • Interrupts or intrudes on others
  • *Symptoms must occur often.

  • Several symptoms were present before age 12 years1
  • Several symptoms must be present in 2 or more settings1

Here are a few examples of how ADHD may affect adults at home, at work, and in social settings:

At Home

  • Loses things necessary for tasks/activities (eg, keys, wallet, mobile phone)
  • Is unable to engage in leisure activities quietly

At Work

  • Leaves seat in situations when remaining seated is expected, such as in meetings
  • Exhibits poor time management
  • Avoids or dislikes tasks that require sustained mental effort (eg, preparing reports or completing forms)

In Social Settings

  • Forgets to keep appointments or return calls
  • Interrupts/intrudes upon what others are doing
  • Completes others’ sentences
  • There is clear evidence that the symptoms interfere with, or reduce the quality of, social, academic, or occupational functioning.1
  • Symptoms do not occur exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or another psychotic disorder and are not better explained by another mental disorder (eg, mood disorder, anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, personality disorder, substance intoxication or withdrawal).1

These are not the complete diagnostic criteria.

NOTE: Diagnosis should be based on a complete history and evaluation of the patient.

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